Hemp indigo embroiderers in Sapa vietnam

Traditionally, the Hmong of Sapa have grown hemp to weave textiles for their personal clothing and household use. When the hemp is ready for harvest, the Hmong women cut the plants and trim the leaves keeping only the stems, which are sun-dried and peeled into thin strips and tied together to create the yarn. They are then dyed with indigo leaves which they grow in their mountain gardens. Once it is ready they weave the raw hemp yarn using a backstrap loom and then the fabric is embroydered by hand

Cambodia has a long history in traditional silk production and weaving is a skill that is passed down from mother to daughter. The “Cambodia Golden silk” is the native silk, however, to meet today’s demand the majority of silk used in Cambodia today imported from Vietnam and China. More recently, many silk weavers have abandoned their craft to seek regular employment in larger cities. Nevertheless less there are still Cambodian women who continue to weave in their villages so that they can be with their children and families rather than migrating to the cities. Cotton is replacing silk and is in high demand to meet new market’s demands. The slight imperfections and unevenness in the weave is the sign of manual manufacture unlike the monotonously perfect industrial fabric available on the high street.

Weaving looms
weaving pattern into the textile
woman weaver
looms in Phom Srock
Cotton in shuttle
Child sleeping whilst village women go about their work
Joining threads

CAMBODIAN CHILDREN

Poverty in Cambodia is severe in rural regions because many rural areas and villages are isolated and far from good health services and roads, which can contribute to limited access to education, health care and employment.

GIRL WITH A CATAPULT
CAMBODIAN GIRL WITH HER DOLL
CAMBODIAN PRE SCHOOCHILDREN

PARIS MIGRANTS: The term “migrant worker” refers to a person who is engaged or has been engaged in a remunerated activity in a State of which he or she is not a national. workers usually do not have an intention to stay permanently in the country or region in which they work.

DOG WALKERS

PHAE PONLEU SELPAK CIRCUS

Phare Ponleu Selpak (PPSA)
was founded in 1994 by nine young Cambodian men returning home from a refugee camp after the fall of the Khmer Rouge. At the camp they took drawing classes and found art to be a powerful tool for healing. When they returned home they began offering free drawing classes to street children. Soon they opened a school, eventually offering formal K-12 education and professional arts training in the areas of visual arts (illustration, painting, graphic design, and animation), theatre, music, dance, and circus. Today more than 1,200 pupils attend the public school daily and 500 attend the vocational arts training programs. All programs are offered for free.

SONGKRAN IN CAMBODIA : Red Shirts meet Thaksin
The rally in Siem Reap was the first time Thaksin spoke on a mass rally stage in person to the Red Shirts. The event came at a time of much insecurity and confusion over the future developments of Thai politics. The Red Shirt-supported government led by Thaksin’s sister Yingluck Shinawatra seems to follow a course of reconciliation, which may also include one or the other form of a general amnesty for politically motivated crimes related to the past 6 years of political conflict, yet the opposition Democrat Party and the two anti-government protest groups the People’s Alliance for Democracy and Siam Samakkhi oppose this course of the government.

CAMBODIAN SECURITY POLICE
CAMBODIAN SECURITY

THAKSIN’S LEAVING TO SPEAK AT THE RED SHIRT RALLY

THAKSIN’S HELECOPTER
CAMBODIAN SECURITY
SECURITY
CROWDS WAITING